“NIMH Info for Parents on ‘ADHD’ Misleading, Researchers Say”

An article titled A discursive analysis concerning information on “ADHD” presented to parents by the National Institute of Mental Health (USA) published in the International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being was the subject of a news piece published in the psychiatry-focused news outlet Mad in America.

An excerpt from the Mad in America piece:

“What seems to have been forgotten is that behaviors perceived as deviating may be reflections of normal variations in personality,” the researchers, Soly Erlandsson, Linda Lundin, and Elizabeth Punzi, all psychologists in Sweden, write.

“Expectations that society places on children of today also contribute to less indulgence toward children who do not fit in,” they add. “Instead, deviance is medicalized and even if the individual child may not suffer the problem becomes primarily a problem for other people and for the social system.”

Describing the United States as the “epicenter” of ADHD diagnoses, and asserting that how the disorder is discussed in the US influences the rest of the world, the researchers decided to investigate how the NIMH presents information on ADHD on its website. They began with the question: “Which understanding of the ‘ADHD’ discourse is taken for granted and which understandings and alternative discourses are not acknowledged?”

Read the Mad in America article in full: NIMH Info for Parents on “ADHD” Misleading, Researchers Say

Access the full IJQHW article: A discursive analysis concerning information on “ADHD” presented to parents by the National Institute of Mental Health (USA)