Editor-in-Chief Asim Duttaroy on FNR’s growth, new international focus

“Good nutrition – and health – are issues of universal concern and relevant to every country and culture in the world,” says Duttaroy. “Likewise, the research we publish should be accessible to everyone and translatable to citizens throughout the world.”


Just last month, Food and Nutrition Research (FNR) published an article suggesting the use of flour made from cowpeas as an ingredient in cookie production; the cowpea inclusion offering a means to increase the amount of protein — and nutritional value — in a food commonly consumed by children.

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Professor Asim Duttaroy

This is particularly noteworthy in countries like Nigeria where malnutrition among children is on the rise, due in part to what’s known as “hidden hunger”, a result of diets too rich in carbohydrates and too poor in other vital nutrients, including protein.

It is this kind of research in particular that elicits a smile from Editor in Chief Asim Duttaroy. In late 2014, Professor Duttaroy – a career researcher who has spent decades exploring the role of certain properties in food in human growth, development and disease prevention — assumed the chief editor position of FNR.

Under his leadership, FNR reached a new milestone in 2015 – drawing more than half a million readers to the journal website. Duttaroy, who has a clear vision for the Journal, is both humbled and encouraged by its recent growth.

“Good nutrition – and health – are issues of universal concern and relevant to every country and culture in the world,” says Duttaroy. “Likewise, the research we publish should be accessible to everyone and translatable to citizens throughout the world.”

“It’s essential that the journal reflects global diversity to be truly relevant.” Duttaroy points to the article on cowpeas as an example of how the journal is becoming more inclusive.

“Food culture – and availability – varies hugely internationally. If a Food and Nutrition Research journal is to be applicable internationally, then the research published should reflect this.”

And this is precisely what has happened during 2015. The journal has become far more diverse, growing organically, receiving and publishing articles from the Far East, Australia and Africa as well as North America and Europe.

Aside from the diversity being represented in the journal, Duttaroy is also excited about the research being published around whole body nutrition, and the role of nutrition in individuals with diseases such as cystic fibrosis.

“This is a very exciting time for FNR,” said Duttaroy. “The fact that we can play a role in potentially improving health globally is hugely gratifying.”


 

Follow Professor Duttaroy online:

Twitter: @asim2001
www.asimduttaroy.com